How to Drysuit Dive Like a Pro

06/20/2019

There are a lot of divers who aim to dive in cold and warm climates all year round. While most of them already own a wetsuit, they are still faced with the dilemma of whether purchasing a Drysuit is worth the investment or not. But why some divers choose wearing a drysuit, you may ask. What we know is that probably their primary motivation is solely based on the diving environment. However, you should know that drysuits both come with pros and cons, just like wetsuits.

In this post, we will be talking about everything that you need to know about how to drysuit drive like a pro. As you may already know, drysuits are best suited for diving in cold waters with below 60-degrees F temperature. To add, some divers prefer wearing drysuits, especially when there is a need to dive for longer periods. With this, let’s now get on with the discussions.

The Basics of Drysuit Diving

If you’re a diver, you know that water keeps heat away from your body. In fact, cold water does this to the human body at least 20 times more than cold air. So, when you’re diving in cold water, you must be using the proper exposure suit to be able to achieve a comfortable diving experience. In addition, you also get to prevent yourself from experiencing hypothermia. This is the very reason why drysuits are perfect for cold water diving. Not only does it keep water out but it also can keep you warm, all thanks to the layer of air around its body.

We know it could get a bit frustrating if you weren’t able to go to your dream dive spot or exotic destinations around the world. And sometimes, you opt to just try the local dive spots to satisfy your cravings. Local diving could also mean cold water diving. In case you didn’t know, there are several dive spots that can only be reached via a drysuit. All you need to do is to learn the skill and you’ll be faced by several diving opportunities around the world, all year round. For instance, there’s a drysuit diving site in the UK, which allows you to dive with seals. Another example would be the Scapa Flow, in which you can wreck dive, as well as shark diving in Oban.

Do You Need to Complete a Drysuit Diving Training?

When you’re diving in a drysuit, there is training that you need to complete. As these suits are another piece of diving equipment that you need to think about while diving, you must learn the things that you must do to use them accurately and ensure that you make your dive as safe and enjoyable as possible. Drysuits can also be used for the control of buoyancy. In fact, drysuits will require you more added weight because they are a lot more buoyant than wetsuits.

In addition to that, there are also safety issues that need to be considered. We do recommend that you complete the drysuit training or orientation, most likely in a confined environment, along with a professional drysuit diver. There’s also a specialty course for drysuit diving that we recommend as well, consisting of a session in a confined space, including two dives in the open water, allowing you to get comfortable in your drysuit. Not only is this very important to complete but it can also be a straightforward yet fun course, which you can complete in a day or two.

How to Drysuit Dive Like a Pro

  • First, put on your undergarment while being seated. With your toes pointed, slide your feet through and gently pull your leg up and stand to pull the drysuit up to your waist.
  • Once done, pull the upper section up to your shoulder or until it feels comfortable enough.
  • Then, insert both of your arms into the armholes. You may do this step with your fingers pointed and together. In case you have lubricated cuffs, your knuckles should be able to slide with minimum resistance. However, keep in mind that you need to take extra caution so you won’t damage, stretch, or snag the cuffs.
  • If you’re using a latex drysuit, make sure that it is flat. For neoprene drysuits, on the other hand, they must be folded under. While you can do this on your own, it would be a lot easier if you have someone to assist you.
  • Then, insert your head through the neck seal.
  • Place the neck seal right above your head and then position your palms inside coming from the top section.
  • Turn your head a bit sideways to give way to the pulling of the seal. This action would likely elongate the opening of the neck. Doing the exact same motion, try slipping the seal down to your neck and then turn your head in a forward position. it is essential that you have someone check the neck seal and see if it’s flat, free of hair, and is not twisted.
  • Close the drysuit zipper. If it’s located in the front, you can simply close it. However, if it’s in the back, it would be much easier to have someone assist you. To fully close the zipper, try grasping the bottom end firmly using one hand and then pull the handle until it’s fully closed. We suggest that you perform one final check if the zipper is secure and fully closed.
  • Once the drysuit has been fully zipped, you now need to get rid of excess air. To do this, insert a couple of fingers into the neck seal and then pull it slightly away. Meanwhile, you may try crouching down, allowing the excess air to exit from the neck seal.
  • Lastly, connect a low-pressure inflator hose to your drysuit. It should be noted, however, that this last step should only be done once the first nine steps have been successfully completed.

Conclusion

Drysuits are commonly used, especially when diving in cold water, allowing you to stay dry and warm. Now that we have reached the end of this post, we hope that you learned a lot about how to drysuit dive like a pro. We understand that this guide may be too complicated for beginners but we trust that you already know that proper training and course completion are still mandatory for you to be able to dive using a drysuit. We hope that you get to apply this new knowledge onto your next diving session.

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